Tag Archives: Tamer Mallat

Lebanon’s Gray Society: breaking the traditional fault lines of Lebanese politics?

Commentary by Tamer Mallat – 6 September 2015

Image courtesy N. Mabsout

Image courtesy N. Mabsout

Lebanon’s micro-uprising has been remarkable in many ways. At first, the “You Stink” movement began as one of modest proportions, interested in the resolution of the extant waste management impasse. Unreasonable repression and governmental indifference, however, unearthed a shared sense of contempt towards a political class deemed by many as corrupt and unable to lead. The movement grew, and with it a debate resounded in Lebanon and abroad. Discussions quickly turned to the workings of our political system and of its sinister dynamics. For some, these protests represent the birth of a Lebanese third way, led by a generation that no longer identifies with the March 14 or March 8 coalitions. The momentum appears to be growing, and yet, the fortress of Lebanese gerontocracy holds steadfast. Notwithstanding institutional resistance, something has changed. This new societal dynamic, while remaining intrinsically rooted in the idiosyncratic nature of the Lebanese political system, may represent a shift of systemic dimensions. Continue reading

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Hariri and I, February 14, 2005 and the memories of a Beiruti adolescent

Tamer Mallat – 14 February 2015

Beirut_cornicheThere I was, the odd and insufferable teenager, waltzing my way – rather awkwardly, and certainly with no sense of elegance – through life, and more precisely, through the seemingly oppressive routine of every child’s inevitable trajectory: school. I was ugly and emaciated. My hair was long, and I believed myself to be some sort of messiah on his way of fulfilling an obscure and prophetic destiny. The future was predictably prosperous, meaningful. Of course, an ominous atmosphere in Beirut remained prevalent, even for me. Even so, an insufferable teenager – that was what I still was. Certainly aloof, chasing girls. But never entirely so. For I grew up in post-war Beirut. It was February 14, the year 2005. Valentine’s day, and I had no date. I was sitting in history class, in a room with a beautiful view of the Mediterranean.  Continue reading

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ISIL’s Iraq Blitzkrieg: A Window of Opportunity to Act in Syria?

Commentary by Tamer Mallat– 14 June 2014

The Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant’s (ISIL, Da’esh in Arabic) lightning invasion of Iraq is a serious cause for alarm. The speed by which it has taken over major Iraqi cities is revealing of the extent of the training its members have received, the numbers it commands and the resources at its disposal. The blitz also demonstrates just how powerful ISIL really is, and how it has asserted itself as a kingmaker in the Syrian civil war. Facing little or no resistance, the success of its operation appears imminent. And yet, this precipitated invasion may offer the first glimmer of hope for the Syrian conflict – the first of its kind in years since the revolution was hijacked by radicals. Continue reading

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Filed under Arab Spring, Foreign Policy & IR, Français, Iraq, Lebanon & Syria

Interview with Egyptian Lawyer Karim Hafez (Part II): The Challenges of Establishing a Premier Law Practice in Egypt

Interview by Tamer Mallat – 2 July 2013

Karim Hafez

Karim Hafez

Karim Hafez is one of the leading lawyers in the Middle East, and is Senior Partner and founder of Hafez Law Firm, a premier trial firm and arbitration practice based out of Cairo, Egypt with offices in Paris, Doha and Jeddah. He obtained his PhD in law from Cambridge University, and has held teaching positions at Harvard Law School and the American University in Cairo, where he is currently Adjunct Professor of Law. ArabsThink has had the opportunity to interview Karim Hafez about his experience in practicing law in Egypt and on Egypt’s dangerous economic situation (Part I, click here for interview). The interview was conducted in June 2013. Continue reading

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Interview with Egyptian Lawyer Karim Hafez (Part I): A Lawyer’s Perspective on Egypt’s Economic Woes

Interview by Tamer Mallat – 2 July 2013

Karim Hafez

Karim Hafez

Karim Hafez is one of the leading lawyers in the Middle East, and is Senior Partner and founder of Hafez Law Firm, a premier trial firm and arbitration practice based out of Cairo, Egypt with offices in Paris, Doha and Jeddah. He obtained his PhD in law from Cambridge University, and has held teaching positions at Harvard Law School and the American University in Cairo, where he is currently Adjunct Professor of Law. ArabsThink  had the opportunity to interview Karim Hafez about his experience in practicing law in Egypt (Part II, click here for interview) and on Egypt’s dangerous economic situation. The interview was conducted in June 2013. Continue reading

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The Underside of Revolution

Essay by Tamer Mallat – 30 January 2013

Execution Metairie

Execution of the Métairie sisters, Nantes 1793 (Debay)

The passing of two years since the beginning of the January 25 Revolution, has done nothing to diminish the ardor of its obstinate partisans. What started as an adjuration for increased rights, dignity, and other such claims of modest, albeit essential substance, has in the course of two tumultuous years, been lost to a cacophony of superseding contradictions bereft of meaning and direction. The nonviolent revolution that came to mark the coming of age of the peoples of the Middle East and North Africa has undergone, in many cases, a severe metamorphosis. The contradiction and evolution lies in the shift from a historicist paradigm to one devoid of trajectory and vice versa, or the simultaneous confusion of both.  Continue reading

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Killing Mr. Lebanon II: Wissam al-Hassan

Commentary by Tamer Mallat – 21 October 2012

Ashraf Rifi and Wissam al-Hassan

Brigadier General Wissam al-Hassan, former Intelligence Chief of the Internal Security Forces (ISF), was one of those rare Lebanese civil servants who did his job, and this ultimately cost him his life. The greatest way to recognize his work and sacrifice lies in the acceptance of this reality. Unfortunately, analyses and reactions alike have so far undermined and overshadowed the accomplishments of General al-Hassan and ISF endeavors over the years, and do little to honor the battles that he has fought to defend Lebanon’s sovereignty. Continue reading

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