Tag Archives: Romana Michelon

Has the European Union finally turned into an influential actor in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict?

Commentary by Romana Michelon and Bart Hesseling – 18 January 2014

A Palestinian flag flies in front of a settlement known to Israelis as Har Homa and to Palestinians as Jabal Abu Ghneim (Ammar Awad/Reuters)

A Palestinian flag flies in front of a settlement known to Israelis as Har Homa and to Palestinians as Jabal Abu Ghneim (Ammar Awad/Reuters)

The European Union’s stance on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict has long emphasized Israel’s right to security but need to end its occupation, and the Palestinians’ right to self-determination but need to renounce terrorism. This past summer, newly-released EU guidelines on Israeli entities operating in the occupied Palestinian Territories shook this well-rehearsed mantra to its core. Preceded by the February appeal from the EU’s Heads of Mission in Jerusalem to take concrete measures against the occupation of Palestine, the Union decided to attach negative economic consequences to the continuation of Israel’s illegal settlement enterprise. Continue reading

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Filed under Arab Spring, English, Foreign Policy & IR, Palestine & Israel

Does Morsi’s Ousting Signify a Blow to the Israeli-Palestinian Peace Process?

Commentary by Romana Michelon – 19 July 2013

An Egyptian soldier stands guard on a watch tower on the border between Israel and Egypt (Source: Reuters/  Ronen Zvulun)

An Egyptian soldier stands guard on a watch tower on the border between Israel and Egypt (Source: Reuters/ Ronen Zvulun)

A little over a year ago, the world’s eyes were fixated on Egypt. Following the huge popular demonstrations that led to the fall of Hosni Mubarak, on June 24, 2012, Muslim Brotherhood-affiliated Mohammed Morsi won the election, and became the country’s first democratically elected President. Egypt was in the spotlight again two weeks ago when, following over a year of popular unrest and growing exasperation, a military coup led to the ouster of Morsi and the installment of Constitutional Court Judge Adly Mansour as interim-president. What will happen next remains a great unknown. The international community expects the new regime to keep its promise and organize democratic elections as soon as possible. In the meantime, Egypt still runs the risk of entering into full-blown civil conflict, as certain elements among Morsi’s supporters have vowed to violently oppose the expulsion of their President. Continue reading

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Filed under Arab Spring, Egypt, English